Carlo Rambaldi had the distinction of being the first special effects artist to be required to prove that his work on a film was not ‘real’.

Dog-mutilation scenes in the 1971 film A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin were so convincingly visceral that its director, Lucio Fulci, was prosecuted for offences relating to animal cruelty.

Fulci would have served a two-year prison sentence had Rambaldi not exhibited the film’s array of props to a courtroom, proving that the scene was not filmed using real animals. [x]

  1. meowethmeowmeow reblogged this from ratatoskidile
  2. ratatoskidile reblogged this from huntergathererchicago
  3. huntergathererchicago reblogged this from catesatomicgarden
  4. catesatomicgarden reblogged this from cacophonism
  5. asklayaleopard reblogged this from gracie-law
  6. azriel-the-daemon-phoenix-god reblogged this from gracie-law
  7. monoenightmare reblogged this from gracie-law
  8. aprils-fools reblogged this from 05550-045
  9. trustyourjournee reblogged this from 05550-045
  10. vincibleignorance reblogged this from soopernintendochalmers
  11. killinjoy reblogged this from 05550-045
  12. nickelbackfeaturingpitbull reblogged this from 05550-045
  13. thxsearchforeuphoria reblogged this from 05550-045
  14. 05550-045 reblogged this from soopernintendochalmers and added:
    Goals.
  15. soopernintendochalmers reblogged this from levarburtonisacinephile
  16. tysoncooley reblogged this from danburyshakes
Short URL for this post: http://tmblr.co/Z-PfOs16pi_XY