Carlo Rambaldi had the distinction of being the first special effects artist to be required to prove that his work on a film was not ‘real’.

Dog-mutilation scenes in the 1971 film A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin were so convincingly visceral that its director, Lucio Fulci, was prosecuted for offences relating to animal cruelty.

Fulci would have served a two-year prison sentence had Rambaldi not exhibited the film’s array of props to a courtroom, proving that the scene was not filmed using real animals. [x]

  1. asklayaleopard reblogged this from gracie-law
  2. azriel-the-daemon-phoenix-god reblogged this from gracie-law
  3. monoenightmare reblogged this from gracie-law
  4. aprils-fools reblogged this from lunabriluna
  5. trustyourjournee reblogged this from lunabriluna
  6. vincibleignorance reblogged this from lobstrocities
  7. killinjoy reblogged this from lunabriluna
  8. nickelbackfeaturingpitbull reblogged this from lunabriluna
  9. thxsxarchf0rxuph0ria reblogged this from lunabriluna
  10. lunabriluna reblogged this from lobstrocities and added:
    Goals.
  11. lobstrocities reblogged this from levarburtonisacinephile
  12. tysoncooley reblogged this from danburyshakes
  13. 510kg reblogged this from danburyshakes
  14. youngjaguar reblogged this from visitor-q
  15. yesterlove reblogged this from visitor-q
  16. visitor-q reblogged this from waisenkind
  17. waisenkind reblogged this from danburyshakes
Short URL for this post: http://tmblr.co/Z-PfOs16pi_XY